July 20, 2010

A Canon Digital SLR Surely Requires A New Tripod

If you haven't read my post on the new Canon T1iSLR I recently purchased, scroll down to see what I think and what I've learned. As you would expect, I also found it necessary to purchase a tripod to use with my new camera. I used it this week to attempt to take some photos of a very cool looking moon. I failed miserably at this task and couldn't figure out how to photograph the moon properly. I kept gettting weird reflections and had problems getting the camera to focus. I'll figure this out eventually.

In spite of not having the necessary skills to photograph the moon, I must say I am very impressed with the Promaster T325P Carbon Fiber Tripod along with the Maglite 2 ball head. The T325P holds 13.25 pounds yet weighs 2.6 pounds. When folded, the T325P is 21.25" high. Its minimum working height is 8.25" and its maximum height is 63". Based upon my limited research, it appears the price of the T325P is fairly reasonable and there are online deals to be had.
The T325P is easy to use and has a built-in level and a compass (I'm not sure yet what I'll use the compass for). The level is a very handy feature to have. I was trying to photograph the moon and I was standing in the middle of the street in front of my house. Using the level was very easy and helpful on this uneven surface.

I am most impressed by the T325P's light weight. This tripod is easy to carry around, yet incredibly sturdy. I'm sure it will also fit in a carry-on bag when I travel. The tripod looks cool and has a nice finish. The twist locks are tight and are easy to use because of their size.

The T325P is equipped with leg spreader locks which must be pushed back to use (instead of being
spring loaded). Personally, I like this better than the spring loaded version as I seem to have more control and there is less to go wrong down the road.

The Maglite ball head are well-built but don't provide quick-release plates like a few of the other ball heads I looked at. The tension controls are easy to use but didn't always work well. It was a bit of a chore to secure my camera when it wasn't level. I had to apply some extra tension to the controls to keep my camera from sliding backwards.

Overall, I was very impressed with both the tripod and the Maglite head. The prices for both were reasonable and in my first test, they both performed admirably. I would recommend this setup to others.

3 comments:

Chris Foley said...

The twist locks are extremely appealing to me. I have a lightweight Manfrotto 'pod for my dSLR that I keep in my trunk, but its flip-switch locks actually wear at my wrists after a long shoot, where I'm moving around a lot.

Have fun!
Chris
@foleypod

KirAsh4 said...

Moon's constantly moving, so unless you have a short shutter time, you're going to need a way to track it to get a nice clear shot.

As for the weird reflections, you could be dealing with one of two, or both issues: a) internal glass elements reflecting the light, and/or b) you need a hood on your lens.

I have a 300mm Nikon lens that I used once to take moon shots with, both with and without the hood. None of the hoodless shots came out, lots of reflections. All of the ones with the hood on worked like a charm.

Brad said...

If you haven't seen Chris Foley's website http://www.foleypod.com/ you should take a look. Lot's of great information for techies!

 
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